DEBT’S HONOR

From my publisher, Rage Machine Books:

The long awaited sequel to our best selling title DEBT’S PLEDGE has finally been released!

Jefferson Odett returns in Jack Mackenzie’s DEBT’S HONOR, an action-packed military science fiction adventure that will have you hooked!

PIRATES, ALIENS, BUREAUCRATS – WHO CAN YOU TRUST?

Korax is a colony world beset by problems. Pirates have targeted the world for plunder, a race of wandering alien nomads have made themselves at home and the colony’s new governor seems intent on making enemies of just about everyone.

Jefferson Odett would rather be out on the rim, fighting the war for humanity, but a misadventure has landed him here. Now he has to try to secure a planet that does not want its new governor, the aliens who have moved in, or the platoon of undisciplined soldiers under Odett’s command. The only thing the colony seems to want is the pirate that Odett has been ordered to kill.

Action-filled military science fiction by the author of DEBT’S PLEDGE.

DEBT’S HONOR is available at Amazon in e-book and in paperback.

ALIENS ON THE MOON!

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You know, I really don’t know why I do this to myself.

I can’t seem to help it. I am just a sucker for those Youtube videos that promise glimpses of strange creatures. You know the ones. “Scary creature caught on video!” “Gnomes (or Fairies or Trolls) caught on film!” “Real mermaid!” “UFO aliens: Best pictures yet!”

So when I saw this documentary on Netflix, I really tried… really tried… to resist watching it.

But I couldn’t. And now I wish that I had.

Aliens on the Moon: The Truth Exposed is a 2014 documentary (and I use that term very loosely in this case) that purports that NASA photos show alien bases on the moon. By enlarging NASA photographs so that the pixels are gigantic, a series of so-called “experts” see all sorts of structures on the moon: A nuclear reactor, wagon wheels, a cannon 1 mile long, a mine. Blurry craters become mile-wide satellite dishes. or crashed spaceships. These “experts” see miles long pipes that must be transporting Helium 3 to be used as energy to power up the huge bases and satellite dished that they can clearly see from otherwise blurry photos of the cratered surface of the moon.

Okay, now, I know that human beings are designed to see patterns in random information. As an artist I am aware that an imaginative mind can see all sorts of pictures in a stucco wall or a ceiling tile. It happens.

Occasionally someone sees the face of Jesus in a water stain. It creates a big flap and people go nuts before someone comes along and says “Calm down. It’s just a random pattern into which we impose our own ideas of order. Nothing to see here.”

Unfortunately that voice of calm and reason is deliberately avoided for an hour and twenty minutes in this hyperventilating, breathless narrative that sees evidence of an extraterrestrial attack force in the random noise of the lunar surface.

The documentary was originally aired on the SYFY channel. Now, SYFY has been starting to get more serious about the quality of their programs but this ranks alongside SHARKTOPUS and SHARKNADO in terms of the thought that went into making it.

To top it off the documentary ends with a segment about a series of videos that purport to show footage from the Apollo 20 mission that discovered an alien city and a mummified woman on the far side of the moon.

These videos appeared on the internet and were very quickly debunked as a hoax perpetrated by a french sculptor named Thierry Speth. Nevertheless, to the makers of this movie it’s gold as it finishes up the documentary in a big way before the producers pack it up (and presumably skip town before the viewers realize how badly they’ve been had).

If you have Netflix, then don’t… seriously, DON’T… waste your time with this documentary.

I should have watched ATTACK THE BLOCK like I’d meant to. Oh well, maybe tonight.

Vampirella: Character or Commodity?

(This is a cross post with the AMAZING STORIES MAGAZINE website where I blog as MD Jackson)

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gonzalez6ftposterPoor Vampirella.

You look at her and you think that she’s free to do what she wants, that she is in charge of her own destiny. The truth is, she is merely a commodity, bought and sold like so much chattel. She is a slave dancing to the whims of her cruel master, who, at this time, is Dynamite Entertainment.

Like a slave from bygone times she has had several owners throughout her miserable life. She has been bought, used up and then sold off to the next buyer.

But it’s not just her alone. All fictional characters are owned by somebody and most of the ones that everyone knows about have likely been bought and sold at least once. They are properties of their creators or their publishing or other entertainment companies and will be until they get so old that they get to enjoy a kind of retirement when they finally slip into the green pasture known as Public Domain.

It was September of 1969, just after the “Summer of Love”. Flower children everywhere were basking in the warm glow of the apex of the hippie era, blissfully unaware of the harsh cold winter that was about to come upon them. It was a time of great upheaval and social change and Forrest J. Ackerman thought: “Hey! We need a sexy vampire woman!”

vampi_trina_robbinsInspired by Jean-Claude Forest’s science fiction heroine Barbarella, who had been made into a film the year before by Roger Vadim, starring his then wife Jane Fonda, Forrest J. Ackerman and James Warren of Warren Publishing came up with the idea of a “vampire-ella” as a counterpoint to the ghoulish male presenters of Warren’s comic magazines Eerie and Creepy.

Ackerman and Warren took the idea to artist Trina Robbins who came up with the general look and a costume which would suggest a vampire’s usual attire but be kind of bathing suit-like to show off Vampirella’s physical attributes.

They took this idea to a rising star in the art world, a powerhouse of an artist named Frank Frazetta. Robbins described the outfit and Frazetta provided the first illustration of the character. Frazetta’s interpretation of Vampirella from Trina Robbin’s description gave her more of some things and less of others… like clothing.

frazetta_vampirella69sep“His original cover art of Vampirella looked a lot like my idea,” Trina Robbins said. “but her costume shrunk.”

With each issue the men drawing the sexy heroine seemed to find ways to make the costume smaller to show off more of Vampirella’s other assets. “By now it doesn’t bear any resemblance to what I designed.” Robbins says.

Vampirella began life as a slightly tacky bit of titillation used to introduce the real horror stories in the early issues of the magazine that bore her name. Eventually, though she grew into a strong character in her own right with her own entourage of supporting cast – both heroes and villains. As time passed the focus was less and less on the traditional horror story and more on the Vampirella story, which quickly established itself as the lead story and the cover page subject.

Jim Warren had the good sense to recognize real artistic talent and many of the top writers and artists in comic book history were published in Vampirella. The one artist who stood out head and shoulders over the rest and who’s art defined Vampirella for decades to come was José “Pepe” Gonzalez, a talented artist originally from Barcelona, Spain.

barbaraleigh-fjaThe magazine was a big success and it ran for 112 issues, finally ending its run in 1983 with the demise of Warren Publishing. After a period in limbo Harris Comics bought the Vampirella title and launched her back into the spotlight.

Their first foray was a “continuation” of the Warren magazine format with issue #113, which had limited success. As such, it is one of the most sought after and rare Vampirella comics. Having tested the water, Harris then produced a range of comics, trade paperbacks, and magazines as well as various peripheral items such as statues and trading cards.

After a steady decline in sales Harris Publishing decided that the Vampirella character was no longer a viable concern. In 2010 Vampirella was sold to Dynamite Entertainment. Dynamite kicked off a new look Vampirella with a monthly series in November 2010.

talisa-soto-2In her time as a comic book icon Vampirella has been drawn by many artists and portrayed by a multitude of models and other pin-up girls. Hammer films tried to turn the property into a movie in 1976. Plans were to have Peter Cushing and John Gielgud in supporting roles to Barbara Legh’s Vampirella. Sadly the project fell through as did Hammer Films shortly afterward.

Vampirella eventually did make it into the movies, albeit not in such a big way. Roger Corman produced a direct-to-video Vampirella in 1996. The film was done on the cheap and it looks it (Vampirella’s outfit looks like an off-the-rack plastic Halloween costume). Former Bond Girl Talisa Soto was cast as Vampirella, despite not having quite the same… assets.

Poor Vampirella. She has been bought and sold, exploited by men, forced to wear a skimpy, barely-there costume, had her origin story changed several times, had her memories stolen, altered and returned to her, and still she goes on working for her cruel masters, providing cheap titillation for the fanboy masses.

When will her suffering end? Will she ever reach the promised land of the Public Domain?

Okay, maybe I’ve pushed the slave metaphor a bit too far. Maybe I’m trying too hard to make some sort of salient and profound point in order to turn this post into something more than just an excuse to show pictures of Vampirella. Then again, Ralph Waldo Emerson said that beauty is it’s own excuse for being. Maybe we can say the same about Vampirella?

Or maybe I’ll just be quiet and you can look at the pictures.

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LOVING THE ALIEN

MD Jackson has another article over at the AMAZING STORIES website:

Human beings have always had a fear of and, at the same time, a fascination with the “other”.

Almost as soon as humans were able to make art on cave walls depictions of strange and bizarre creatures began showing up amongst depictions of their fellows and animals. The stone walls of ancient Egypt were rife with depictions of gods with human bodies and the heads of jackals or eagles or snakes.

In modern times, when gods were replaced with aliens, depictions of beings from other planets have ranged from the sublime to the ridiculous.

Before the twentieth century a number of Victorian illustrators, chief among them French illustrator Isidore Grandville, were adept at creating menageries full of wild and outrageous creatures, but it was in the twentieth century with the rise of the science fiction pulps, that alien creatures really took center stage.

J. Allen St, John, a marvelous illustrator from the very earliest part of the century, had the enviable opportunity to be one of the first to illustrate the fantastic tales of Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Although mostly remembered as the author who created Tarzan, Burroughs also wrote planetary romances set on the Moon, Mars, Venus and even at the earth’s core. Burroughs’ books contain a menagerie of alien creature which were ably depicted by St. John. From Martian Thoats to Lunar Kalkars St. John’s depictions inspired the imaginations of readers of the Blue Book and All-Story Magazines where Burroughs’ stories first saw print.

Read the rest of this article over at the AMAZING STORIES website.