DAVINCI’S DEMONS

So last night I started watching DaVinci’s Demons, a British-American series which presents a highly fantastical representation of Leonardo Davinci’s early adult life as an artist, inventor, idealist and intellect and Florence under the Medici’s. The series is conceived and written by David S. Goyer.

Described as a historical fantasy, the series explores the untold story of DaVinci “inventing” the future at the age of 25, at a time in history when “thought and faith are controlled…as one man fights to set knowledge free.” The young DaVinci struggles with his inner darkness “tortured by a gift of superhuman genius. He is a heretic intent on exposing the lies of religion. An insurgent seeking to subvert an elitist society. A bastard son who yearns for legitimacy with his father.”

I was not expecting much with this show so I was pleasantly surprised at how good it is. It strikes the right balance of history and fantasy. DaVinci is presented as a sort of Florentine Sherlock, his unique vision and insights highlighted by moments of slow-motion and animated DaVinci drawings.

In fact, if you’re waiting impatiently for the new season of SHERLOCK in October (and, let’s face it, who isn’t?) then this just might be the series to tide you over. Visually it is very lush with beautiful scenery and costumes and, as this is Starz, there are enough expletives, boobs, bums and dicks on display to satisfy the GAME OF THRONES/SPARTACUS crowd. There is also enough action, sword fights, spurting blood, clever chases and explosions to satisfy attention deficit viewers.

Tom Riley does his best Benedict Cumberbatch/Johnny Lee Miller as Leonardo. He is difficult, a womanizer, a drunkard as well as a man of frenetic action and tortured genius. The rest of the cast is good and mostly British. DEEP SPACE NINE fans will recognize Julian Bashir — Alexander Siddig as Al-Rahim and SHERLOCK aficionados will recognize Irene Adler — Lara Pulver as Clarice Orsini.

I’m only two episodes in but I’m enjoying it enormously and I would recommend it based on the opening two. There are only eight episodes in the first season but it has been renewed for a second. It’s certainly worth a look.

 

Why are we Crowdfunding Novels?

internet begging

Okay, I’m just gonna put it out there; Why are we crowdfunding novels?

If you don’t know, crowdfunding is a method of finding financial backers for a project that requires startup funds. Instead of finding a few wealthy investors, the projects hits the internet in search of a whole lot of backers who are willing to kick in a smaller amount. Kickstarter  is a website that specializes in these campaigns. Another is Indiegogo.

I have no problem with finding investors for a project that needs startup cash if there is a chance the investors will get a return on their investments. But what exactly are we funding when we crowdfund an author writing a novel? Are we kicking in to support the author while he dedicates all his time to writing?

I’m sorry, but the idea just sits wrong with me. I wrote four novels in my spare time while I was working to support a family. If something is important to you, you find the time. Writing these novels was important so I found the time. I woke up an hour earlier than my usual time and spent that first hour of the day working solidly, every morning, until I finished. It’s a habit I still have to this day.

Look, I sympathize with any writer who is struggling — trying to make ends meet is tough if you are a writer only. But sometimes you have to do what you have to do. Jobs are tough to find in this economy, I know, but to resort to what amounts to electronic panhandling… something about that just gets in my craw.

Maybe I’m wrong about this. Maybe I’m sounding like a member of the Tea Party, but honestly I’m not against welfare. I wrote part of a novel while I was on EI here in Canada (I didn’t get on to EI just to write the novel, but since I was on it I took advantage of the time). J. K. Rowling wrote her first Harry Potter novel while she was on the dole in Great Britain. Lots of novels get written that way. I don’t have a problem with that.

But this crowdfunding, I have a problem with it.

Maybe I’ve got the wrong end of the stick and, honestly, I would welcome discussion about this. I’m open minded enough to listen to counter arguments and I probably can be persuaded by a strong enough argument. If I’m missing something, please let me know.

Until then, I’ll be up at the crack of dawn each morning to get in as many words as I can before heading off to my day job.